If you think outside the box, “externality” thinking is impossible

I read Bruno Latour’s “Science in Action” several decades ago (as a graduate student in information science). Here’s a quick update from the professor, albeit in an interview that is very difficult to follow, mainly because of the way interviewer / interviewee (fail to) communicate with one another — ironically, this is a tragic case of inappropriate technology in action. 😉

The joy of admitting when you don’t know

blogging , personal , lifestyle , relationships , honest , friendships , honesty , conversations , knowledge

WHAT ABOUT LARA

Here’s something I learned recently: Nobody, and I mean nobody, knows what the fuck they’re doing. It’s lesson that has encouraged me to live a more honest and authentic life with loved ones and strangers alike.

I throw my hands in the air when I fuck up. I tell my boss when I feel like I feel like I’m about to fuck up. If somebody asks me a question I don’t know the answer to, I point them in the direction of somebody who can instead of fumbling around for some sort of reasonable response to make myself look all knowledgeable and superior and stuff.

I message my friends in the vicinity of their birthdays for the exact date they’ll be tallying another digit onto their age because I will forget. And, if I don’t know what the fuck you’re talking about, I am not going to pretend that…

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Advice Doesn’t Help Us Generate Knowledge

advice, Engaging, Knowledge, Learning, Meaning, Memory, Thought

Novel Learning

As you would expect, Michael Bungay Stanier’s book The Coaching Habit is all about how to be a more effective coach. Part of becoming a more effective coach involves understanding how the brain works so that you can understand how the people you coach are going to learn and react in certain situations. To help demonstrate the importance of knowing how the brain works, Bungay Stanier references Josh Davis and his colleagues from the NeuroLeeadership Institute and their model known as “AGES”. Specifically, Bungay Stanier focuses on the “G” from AGES.

G stands for Generation, and commenting on knowledge generation, Bungay Stanier writes, “Advice is overrated. I can tell you something, and it’s got a limited chance of making its way into your brain’s hippocampus, the region  that encodes memory. If I can ask you a question and you generate the answer yourself, the odds increase substantially.” What is important…

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